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VOLUME 11 , ISSUE 6 ( December, 2010 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Smear Layer Removal for Collagen Fiber Exposure after Citric Acid Conditionings

Fabio Renato Manzolli Leite, José Eduardo Cezar Sampaio, Andrea Abi Rached Dantas, Rodrigo Cavassim, Daniela Leal Zandim

Citation Information : Leite FR, Sampaio JE, Dantas AA, Cavassim R, Zandim DL. Smear Layer Removal for Collagen Fiber Exposure after Citric Acid Conditionings. J Contemp Dent Pract 2010; 11 (6):1-8.

DOI: 10.5005/jcdp-11-6-1

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Published Online: 00-12-2010

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2010; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

The aim of the present study was to compare the removal of the smear layer and exposure of collagen fibers of the root surface following the application of five citric acid solution concentrations.

Methods and Materials

Two hundred seventy (270) samples were equally divided into six groups (n=45) for treatment with saline solution (control) and five different concentrations of citric acid (0.5, 1, 2, 15, and 25 percent). Three acid application methods were used (passive, brushing, and burnishing) as well as three application periods (1, 2, and 3 minutes). A previously trained, calibrated (kappa score = 0.93), and blind examiner subsequently scored scanning electron micrographs (SEMs) of the samples. Statistical analyses were performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post-hoc tests.

Results

According to the results obtained and within the limitations of the methodology used, the citric acid applications were more effective than the control treatment of applying saline solution (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were observed among the three application methods and three application periods. Descriptive analyses showed that best results for exposure of collagen fibers were obtained with the application of citric acid at 25 percent by brushing for 1 or 3 minutes.

Conclusions

The best results for exposure of collagen fibers in this study were obtained with application of citric acid at 25 percent by brushing for 1 or 3 minutes, even though there were no statistically significant differences among the groups.

Clinical Significance

The best results for exposure of collagen fibers on root surfaces noted in this study were obtained with application of citric acid at 25 percent by brushing for 1 or 3 minutes.

Citation

Cavassim R, Leite FRM, Zandim DL, Dantas AAR, Sampaio JEC. Smear Layer Removal for Collagen Fiber Exposure after Citric Acid Conditionings. J Contemp Dent Pract [Internet]. 2010 December; 11(6):001-008. Available from: http://www.thejcdp.com/journal/view/volume11- issue6-cavassim


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