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VOLUME 11 , ISSUE 6 ( December, 2010 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

The Effects of Orthodontic Movement on a Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft in the Treatment of Gingival Recession

Ivan Pedro Taffarel, Ana Leticia Rocha Avila, Gabriela Molina Silva, Maria Cecilia Galacini Añez

Citation Information : Taffarel IP, Avila AL, Silva GM, Añez MC. The Effects of Orthodontic Movement on a Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft in the Treatment of Gingival Recession. J Contemp Dent Pract 2010; 11 (6):73-79.

DOI: 10.5005/jcdp-11-6-73

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Published Online: 01-12-2010

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2010; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

The purpose of this article is to report on the five-year follow-up of a case involving treatment of gingival recession with a subepithelial connective tissue graft prior to orthodontic tooth movement.

Background

Gingival recession has a global prevalence that varies from 3 to 100 perpcent depending on the population studied and the method of analysis. In addition, the frequency of recession seems to be positively correlated with age. Planned orthodontic tooth movement is not necessarily an etiological factor for gingival recession, so long as it does not move the tooth out of its alveolar process. When the tooth is shifted without adequate biomechanical control, bone dehiscence can develop, and the recession can occur as a consequence of the orthodontic treatment.

Case Description

A 19.6-year-old female patient was referred for orthodontic treatment due to severe anterior-inferior dental crowding and a mandibular right lateral incisor in linguoverson and 4.0 mm of gingival recession on the labial surface. Normal gingival architecture was restored with a subepithelial connective tissue graft used to cover the 4.0 mm defect, after which orthodontic treatment repositioned the malposed incisor into its correct occlusal alignment. Individualized torque was applied to the mandibular right central incisor during the orthodontic treatment. The patient was reevaluated five years after completion of the orthodontic treatment.

Results

At the five-year recall appointment, the patient exhibited normal tooth alignment and generalized normal gingival architecture; however, 2 mm of gingival recession was noted on the graft site.

Summary

This case demonstrated that periodontal surgical correction of facial gingival recession with a subepithelial graft may be performed prior to initiating orthodontic treatment.

Clinical Significance

The interdisciplinary association between orthodontics and periodontics contributes to good prognosis and acquisition or maintenance of the periodontal tissue health, masticatory function, esthetics, and patient satisfaction. The subepithelial connective tissue graft placed prior to the orthodontic movement showed satisfactory results five years after completion of the orthodontic treatment.

Citation

Tanaka OM, Avila ALR, Silva GM, Añez MCG, Taffarel IP. The Effects of Orthodontic Movement on a Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft in the Treatment of Gingival Recession. J Contemp Dent Pract [Internet]. 2010 December; 11(6):073-079. Available from: http://www.thejcdp. com/journal/view/volume11-issue6-tanaka


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