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VOLUME 15 , ISSUE 6 ( November-December, 2014 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Is It Possible to use Cross-sectional and Vertical Facial Measurements to establish the Shape of the Mandibular Arch?

Adilson Luiz Ramos, Ossam Abu El Haje, Daniela Daufenback Pompeo, Gisela Crippa Furtado, Luciana Monti Lima Rivera

Citation Information : Ramos AL, Haje OA, Pompeo DD, Furtado GC, Rivera LM. Is It Possible to use Cross-sectional and Vertical Facial Measurements to establish the Shape of the Mandibular Arch?. J Contemp Dent Pract 2014; 15 (6):735-739.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1608

Published Online: 01-12-2014

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2014; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Background

Given the benefits of radiographic cephalometric studies in determining patterns of dental-skeletal-facial normality in orthodontics, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between mandibular dental arch shape and cross-sectional and vertical facial measurements.

Materials and methods

It was analyzed plaster casts and teleradiographs in frontal and lateral norm belonging to 50 individuals, aged between 15 and 19 years, with no previous history of orthodontic treatment and falling into four of the six Andrews's occlusion keys. The plaster models were scanned (3D) and the images of the dental arches were classified subjectively as oval, triangular and quadrangular by three calibrated examiners, with moderate inter-examiner agreement (Kappa = 0.50). After evaluation of the method error by paired t test (p > 0.05), it was carried out the analysis of cross-sectional and vertical facial measurements to be compared to the shape of the dental arch. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance with a significance level of 5%.

Results

When the VERT index was compared with the three arch shapes, no measurement showed statistically significant differences (p > 0.05): triangular (0.54); oval (0.43); and quadrangular (0.73); as well as there were no differences (p > 0.05) in the widths of the face (141.20; 141.26; 143.27); maxilla (77.27; 77.57; 78.59) and mandible (105.13; 103.96; 104.28).

Conclusion

It can be concluded that there was no correlation between different shapes of the mandibular dental arch and the cross-sectional and vertical facial measurements investigated.

How to cite this article

El Haje OA, Pompeo DD, Furtado GC, Rivera LML, Paranhos LR. Is It Possible to use Cross-sectional and Vertical Facial Measurements to establish the Shape of the Mandibular Arch? J Contemp Dent Pract 2014;15(6):735-739.


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