The Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice

Register      Login

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue

Online First

Archive
Related articles

VOLUME 17 , ISSUE 12 ( December, 2016 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Effect of Dental Luting Cements on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus: An in vitro Study

S Khan, SMA Feroz, A Bhoyar

Citation Information : Khan S, Feroz S, Bhoyar A. Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Effect of Dental Luting Cements on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus: An in vitro Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016; 17 (12):973-977.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1966

Published Online: 01-12-2016

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2016; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction

This study aimed at evaluating and comparing the antibacterial activity of six types of dental luting cements on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using the agar diffusion test (ADT) and the direct-contact test (DCT). The antibacterial activity in ADT was measured based on the diameter of the zone of inhibition formed, whereas in DCT the density of the bacterial suspension was measured. The lower the density of the suspension, the more antibacterial activity the cement possesses.

Materials and methods

Agar diffusion test was carried out on the bacteria. After an incubation period of 24 hours, the plates were checked for the presence of zone of inhibition. In DCT the cement was mixed and applied. Once the cement was set, bacterial suspension and brain–heart infusion medium was poured and incubated for 24 hours. After 24 hours, the plate was placed in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plate reader, which measured the optical density of the fluid. The first set of data was recorded approximately 1 hour after incubation. Overall, three sets of data were recorded. Additional experiments were performed on set test materials that were allowed to age for 24 hours, 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months.

Results

When using ADT only two cements zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and zinc polycarboxylate (ZPC) cement showed antibacterial activity against the test organisms. When using DCT, all cements showed some amount of antibacterial activity. Zinc oxide eugenol and ZPC cement showed highest amount of antibacterial activity against S. mutans and L. acidophilus respectively.

Conclusion

Within the limitations of study, ZOE cement and ZPC cement were most effective against the tested microorganisms followed by the newer resin cement. The glass ionomer cement was the weakest of all.

Clinical significance

Patients with high caries index can be treated more effectively using the abovementioned cements.

How to cite this article

Feroz SMA, Bhoyar A, Khan S. Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Effect of Dental Luting Cements on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus: An in vitro Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(12):973-977.


PDF Share
  1. Factors that affect the adhesion of composite to enamel. Gen Dent 1982 Nov-Dec;30(6):477-480.
  2. Dental cements: current status and future prospects. Dent Clin North Am 1983 Oct;27(4):763-792.
  3. Lactobacillus acidophilus and dental caries. Am J Public Health 1938 Jun;28(6):759-761.
  4. Antimicrobial action of dental cements. J Prosthet Dent 1980 Mar;43(3):309-312.
  5. Antibacterial activity of dental luting cement. J Minim Interv Dent 2009;2(4):220-222.
  6. Antibacterial properties of aged dental cements evaluated by direct-contact and agar diffusion tests. J Prosthet Dent 2005 Apr;93(4):364-371.
  7. Antibacterial effect of two luting cements on prepared dentin in vitro and in vivo. Acta Odontol Scand 1978;36(6):363-369.
  8. Antibacterial action of dental cements. J Prosthet Dent 1980 Mar;43(3):309-312.
  9. Antibacterial properties of dental restorative materials: a review. Int Endod J 1988 Mar;21(2):155-160.
  10. Bactericidal effect of dentin primer containing antibacterial monomer methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) against bacteria in human carious dentin. J Oral Rehabil 2001 Apr;28(4):314-319.
  11. The antibacterial effects of zinc ion migration from zinc-based glass polyalkenoate cements. J Mater Sci Mater Med 2006 Jun;17(6):489-494.
  12. Physiologic actions of zinc related to inhibition of acid and alkali production by oral streptococci in suspensions and biofilms. Oral Microbiol Immunol 2004 Feb;19(1):31-38.
  13. Effects of fluoride on the microbial ecology of dental plaque. J Dent Res 1990 Feb;69:653-659.
  14. Biochemical effects of fluoride on oral bacteria. J Dent Res 1990 Feb;69:660-667.
  15. Fluoride in dental plaque and its effects. J Dent Res 1990 Feb;69:645-652.
  16. Co-operative inhibition by fluoride and zinc of glucosyl transferase production and polysaccharide synthesis by mutans streptococci in suspension cultures and biofilms. FEMS Microbiol Lett 2006 Jan;254(1):134-140.
  17. Multiple stress responses in Streptococcus mutans and the induction of general and stress-specific proteins. Microbiology 2000 Jan;146(Pt 1): 107-117.
  18. Antibacterial activity of resin adhesives, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a compomer in contact with dentin caries samples. Oper Dent 2000 Jul-Aug;25(4):265-269.
  19. Growth inhibition of glass ionomer cements on mutans streptococci. Pediatr Dent 1994 Sep-Oct;16(5):346-349.
  20. Antibacterial properties of glass-ionomer cements and other restorative materials. Oper Dent 1989 Spring;14(2):77-81.
PDF Share
PDF Share

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.