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VOLUME 17 , ISSUE 3 ( March, 2016 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

An Accurate Methodology to detect Leaching of Nickel and Chromium Ions in the Initial Phase of Orthodontic Treatment: An in vivo Study

R Vinoth Kumar, N Rajvikram, P Rajakumar, R Saravanan, V Arun Deepak

Citation Information : Kumar RV, Rajvikram N, Rajakumar P, Saravanan R, Deepak VA. An Accurate Methodology to detect Leaching of Nickel and Chromium Ions in the Initial Phase of Orthodontic Treatment: An in vivo Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016; 17 (3):205-210.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1828

Published Online: 00-03-2016

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2016; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of nickel and chromium ions in human saliva during fixed orthodontic therapy.

Materials and methods

Ten patients with Angle's Class-I malocclusion with bimaxillary protrusion without any metal restorations or crowns and with all the permanent teeth were selected. Five male patients and five female patients in the age group range of 14 to 23 years were scheduled for orthodontic treatment with first premolar extraction. Saliva samples were collected in three stages: sample 1, before orthodontic treatment; sample 2, after 10 days of bonding sample; and sample 3, after 1 month of bonding. The samples were analyzed for the following metals nickel and chromium using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

Results

The levels of nickel and chromium were statistically significant, while nickel showed a gradual increase in the first 10 days and a decline thereafter. Chromium showed a gradual increase and was statistically significant on the 30th day.

Conclusion

There was greatest release of ions during the first 10 days and a gradual decline thereafter. Control group had traces of nickel and chromium. While comparing levels of nickel in saliva, there was a significant rise from baseline to 10th and 30th-day sample, which was statistically significant. While comparing 10th day to that of 30th day, there was no statistical significance. The levels of chromium ion in the saliva were more in 30th day, and when comparing 10th-day sample with 30th day, there was statistical significance.

Clinical significance

Nickel and chromium levels were well within the permissible levels. However, some hypersensitive individuals may be allergic to this minimal permissible level.

How to cite this article

Kumar RV, Rajvikram N, Rajakumar P, Saravanan R, Deepak VA, Vijaykumar V. An Accurate Methodology to detect Leaching of Nickel and Chromium Ions in the Initial Phase of Orthodontic Treatment: An in vivo Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(3):205-210.


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