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VOLUME 17 , ISSUE 8 ( August, 2016 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Improved Visualization and Assessment of Condylar Position in the Glenoid Fossa for Different Occlusions: A CBCT Study

Amandeep Kaur, Amanpreet S Natt, Simranjeet K Mehra, Karan Maheshwari, Amanjot Kaur

Citation Information : Kaur A, Natt AS, Mehra SK, Maheshwari K, Kaur A. Improved Visualization and Assessment of Condylar Position in the Glenoid Fossa for Different Occlusions: A CBCT Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016; 17 (8):679-686.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1912

Published Online: 01-08-2016

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2016; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction

The position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa plays an important role in the stability of occlusion after orthodontic treatment. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides an optimal imaging of the osseous components of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and give a full size truly threedimensional (3D) description in real anatomical size. The present study aimed to visualize and compare the position of condyle in the glenoid fossa for different occlusions by using CBCT.

Materials and methods

Cone beam computed tomographic images of 45 subjects, aged 18 to 42 years, were evaluated. Subjects were equally divided into three groups according to the A point, nasion, B point (ANB) angle.

Results

In the sagittal plane, condyle is positioned nonconcentrically; positioned anteriosuperiorly in class I and III occlusions and lies posteriosuperiorly in class II occlusion. In the frontal plane, condyle is positioned centrally (mediolaterally) in all the three types of occlusions. In the axial plane, the parameters showed significant difference between the different occlusions. No statistical significant distinction could be made in the position of the condyle when comparing the right and left joints.

Conclusion

The position of condyle in glenoid fossa influences sagittal, transverse, and vertical relationships of the jaws which eventually contribute to development of various malocclusions. Nonconcentricity is the feature of the condyle in the sagittal plane in different malocclusions.

Clinical significance

An important consideration in orthodontic treatment is the recognition of the importance that the dentition should be in harmony with the related musculoskeletal structures. Therefore, the condylar position is an important concern in maintaining or restoring temporomandibular harmony with the dentition and the position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa plays an important role in the stability of occlusion after orthodontic treatment.

How to cite this article

Kaur A, Natt AS, Mehra SK, Maheshwari K, Singh G, Kaur A. Improved Visualization and Assessment of Condylar Position in the Glenoid Fossa for Different Occlusions: A CBCT Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(8):679-686.


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