The Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice

Register      Login

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue

Online First

Archive
Related articles

VOLUME 17 , ISSUE 9 ( September, 2016 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Prevalence of Deleterious Oral Habits and Oral Mucosal Lesions among Fishermen Population of Mahe, South India

KSA Anzil, J Mathews, AG Sai, M Kiran, S Kevin, S Sunith

Citation Information : Anzil K, Mathews J, Sai A, Kiran M, Kevin S, Sunith S. Prevalence of Deleterious Oral Habits and Oral Mucosal Lesions among Fishermen Population of Mahe, South India. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016; 17 (9):745-749.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1923

Published Online: 00-09-2016

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2016; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction

Fishing is an occupation associated with uneven diet, strain, drunkenness, tobacco use, and deleterious habits. The physical state of laborers on a large scale will also be influenced by conditions at their work site. Oral mucosal lesions can occur as a result of infections, local shock or infuriation, systemic diseases, and uncontrolled usage of tobacco, betel quid, and alcohol. The aim of the present study is to assess the prevalence of deleterious oral habits and oral mucosal lesions among fishermen population of Mahe, South India.

Materials and methods

The study population consists of 362 fishermen aged between 15 and 54. The questionnaire consisted of questions on personal data, and information related to the subjects’ oral habits were collected by the interview. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Assessment Form was designed for the assessment of oral mucosal lesions.

Results

Among the 362 fishermen, 266 (73.48%) were males and 96 (26.52%) were females. The overall prevalence of smoking, alcohol consumption, and gutka chewing was found to be 24.3, 48.85, and 32.4% respectively. Smokeless tobacco (32.4%) was the most prevalent habit followed by smoking tobacco (24.3%). The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was 14.9%. There is a statistically significant association between age groups and habits considered.

Conclusion

Findings of the present study suggest that oral health condition of the fisherfolk community was relatively poor, with high habit prevalence and oral mucosal lesions. This epidemiological study has provided baseline data to plan further research in this area.

Clinical significance

Low socioeconomic status, strenuous working hours, inadequate diet and nutrition intake, stress, and use of tobacco and alcohol act as contributing factors for ill health and oral diseases. It is a challenging population to the clinician to identify and treat them.

How to cite this article

Anzil KSA, Mathews J, Sai AG, Kiran M, Kevin S, Sunith S. Prevalence of Deleterious Oral Habits and Oral Mucosal Lesions among Fishermen Population of Mahe, South India. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(9):745-749.


PDF Share
  1. Oral health status and treatment needs of a rural Indian fishing community. West Indian Med J 2008 Sep;57(4):414-417.
  2. Oral health-related cultural beliefs for four racial/ethnic groups: assessment of the literature. BMC Oral Health 2008 Sep 15;8:26.
  3. Oral health status of fishermen and non-fishermen community of Kutch district, Gujarat, India: a comparative study. Int Marit Health 2014;65(1):1-6.
  4. Exploring oral hygiene practices and periodontal status of fishermen population of Mahe – a cross sectional study. J Odontol Res 2013;1(2):34-42.
  5. Oral health surveys: basic methods. 4th ed. Geneva: World Health Organization; 1997.
  6. National oral health survey and fluoride mapping 2002–2003 India. New Delhi: Dental Council of India; 2004.
  7. Tobacco use & social status in Kerala. Indian J Med Res 2007 Oct;126(4):300-308.
  8. A study to assess the oral health status and treatment needs of fishermen population in coastal region of Tamil Nadu. J Indian Assoc Public Health Dent 2011;(18):266-277.
  9. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among fishermen of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India. Int Marit Health 2014;65(4):192-198.
  10. Assessment of oral health among seafarers in Mundra Port, Kutch, Gujarat. Int Marit Health 2015;66(1):11-17.
  11. Prevalence of oral lesions in relation to habits: cross-sectional study in South India. Indian J Dent Res 2006 Jul-Sep;17(3):121-125.
  12. A study to assess the oral health status and treatment needs of fishermen population in coastal region of Kerala. Kerala Dent J 2012 Oct;35(4):407-414.
  13. Cigarette smoking by socioeconomic group, sex, and age: effects of price, income, and health publicity. BMJ 1994 Oct 8;309(6959):923-927.
  14. High prevalence of tobacco use and associated oral mucosal lesion among interstate male migrant workers in urban Kerala, India. Iran J Cancer Prev 2015 Dec;8(6):e3876.
  15. Prevalence of tobacco and alcohol consumption among fishermen in Udupi Taluk’ Karnataka, India: a cross-sectional study. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2016;17(4):1733-1737.
  16. Assessment of addictions among fishermen in southern-east costal area of Mumbai, India. IOSR J Dent Med Sci 2013 May-Jun;6(6):71-79.
  17. A preliminary clinical study on the oral lesions among the Dumagats. J Philipp Dent Assoc 1998 Sep-Nov;50(2):36-42.
  18. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among chewing tobacco users: a cross-sectional study. Indian J Dent Res 2015 Sep-Oct;26(5):537-541.
PDF Share

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.