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VOLUME 18 , ISSUE 6 ( June, 2017 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Assessment of Levels of Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Patients with Periodontal Pathologies: A Comparative Study

Saurabh Wahi, Alok Tripathi, Shradha Wahi, Vikas D Mishra, Abhishek P Singh, Nikhil Sinha

Citation Information : Wahi S, Tripathi A, Wahi S, Mishra VD, Singh AP, Sinha N. Assessment of Levels of Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Patients with Periodontal Pathologies: A Comparative Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2017; 18 (6):506-509.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-2074

Published Online: 01-06-2017

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2017; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction

One of the potential sources for the occurrence of various systemic pathologies, such as cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases is periodontitis. Testing of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA) is a highly standardized procedure and is becoming increasingly popular these days due to its cost-effectiveness and ease of use. Literature quotes numerous studies associating the periodontal diseases with various hemoglobin markers in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Hence, we planned the present study to assess the levels of HbA in patients with periodontitis among nondiabetic patients.

Materials and methods

For the present study, a total of 50 nondiabetic subjects who reported to the department with the chief complaint of periodontitis were included. Another set of 50 nondiabetic individuals were included in the present study of comparable age in whom no periodontitis was detected clinically. Clinical examination and radiographic evaluation was performed for the selection of the cases for the study group. The patients were sent to the laboratory after the clinical examination, for the testing of HbA. Testing of the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of all the subjects and controls was performed and values were noted and evaluated.

Results

Nonsignificant results were obtained while comparing the mean HbA1c concentrations among the study group and the control group. Nonsignificant results were obtained while comparing the mean HbA1c levels among males and females. While comparing the mean HbA1c levels between the study group and the control group divided on the basis of body mass index, nonsignificant results were obtained.

Conclusion

In nondiabetic subjects, no significant correlation could be observed between periodontitis and HbA1c levels.

Clinical significance

The HbA1c cannot be used as a reliable maker for differentiation of patients with periodontal pathologies from patients free of periodontal pathologies.

How to cite this article

Wahi S, Tripathi A, Wahi S, Mishra VD, Singh AP, Sinha N. Assessment of Levels of Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Patients with Periodontal Pathologies: A Comparative Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2017;18(6):506-509.


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