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VOLUME 22 , ISSUE 5 ( May, 2021 ) > List of Articles

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Oral Hygiene Myths and its Association with Gingival Health Status among Patients in Aseer Region of Saudi Arabia: A Cross-sectional Study

Khalil I Assiri, Muhammed Ajmal, Buthainah M Al-Ahmari, Hatoon S Abumelha, Rahaf A Almobty, Reema A Almobty, Saeed Arem, Sandeepa N Chalikkandy

Keywords : Gingival health, Myths in dentistry, Oral hygiene

Citation Information : Assiri KI, Ajmal M, Al-Ahmari BM, Abumelha HS, Almobty RA, Almobty RA, Arem S, Chalikkandy SN. Oral Hygiene Myths and its Association with Gingival Health Status among Patients in Aseer Region of Saudi Arabia: A Cross-sectional Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2021; 22 (5):506-510.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-3062

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 09-07-2021

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2021; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim and objective: The aim of the study is to assess “Myths in dentistry related to Oral Hygiene and its association with Gingival Health Status among patients visiting Institutional diagnostic clinic in Aseer region of Saudi Arabia.” Materials and methods: The present study was a cross-sectional study done on 152 subjects attending Institutional diagnostic clinic in Aseer region Saudi Arabia. Myths in dentistry related to oral hygiene were assessed by using a ten-item, multiple-choice, close-ended structured questionnaire and Gingival Health Status was assessed using gingival index described by Loe and Silness on the Ramfjord teeth. For the comparison of proportions, a Chi–Square test was used with continuity correction whenever appropriate. “p” value of <0.05 was taken to be statistically significant for the purpose of analysis. Results: A total of 152 study subjects were included in the study, of which 60.5% were males and the rest 39.5% were females. Eighty-two percent of the study subjects believed that myths do affect the oral hygiene of the person. Combinational use of household ingredients (like apple vinegar, turmeric, lemon, baking soda, coal, honey, and sodium bicarbonate) was seen among 40% of the subjects. A majority of 48% learned from family as a source of information and 53% believed that use of household ingredients would improve the esthetical value (bleaching) of the tooth. Eighty-two percent of the study subjects believed that myths do affect the oral hygiene of the person. 40.8% had some form of gingival health problem. There was no statistically association observed between myths in dentistry related to oral hygiene and gingival health. Conclusion: The present study revealed that myths in dentistry related to oral hygiene are quite prevalent in society. The use of household ingredients can influence oral health status and one has to ensure the judicious use if good oral health is to be expected. Clinical significance: Myths in dentistry related to oral hygiene can influence a lot on oral health and this can augment the health of the individual in any direction. So as a responsible clinician, it is very important to address these issues and bring in more health awareness among the study population to achieve the social goal—“health for all.”


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