The Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice

Register      Login

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue

Online First

Archive
Related articles

VOLUME 8 , ISSUE 3 ( March, 2007 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Attitudes of Romanian Dental Students Towards Tobacco and Alcohol

Alexandrina L. Dumitrescu

Citation Information : Dumitrescu AL. Attitudes of Romanian Dental Students Towards Tobacco and Alcohol. J Contemp Dent Pract 2007; 8 (3):64-71.

DOI: 10.5005/jcdp-8-3-64

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Published Online: 00-03-2007

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2007; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to assess smoking and alcohol use in male and female Romanian dental students and to compare this with different levels of education.

Methods and Materials

A total of 315 questionnaires were distributed to male and female dental students (first to sixth year students).

Results

Among the 315 respondents, 37.33% were smokers and 71.04% o f students used alcohol on a regular basis. Overall, there was a 30-day smoking prevalence of 32.47%. Among those who smoked daily, 24% were sixth year students and only 10% were first year. The average number of cigarettes smoked was thirteen cigarettes per day with males smoking more than females (p<0.0001). The average number of years as a smoker was five years, with fifth and sixth year students smoking longer than others (p<0.001). The average age when students started to smoke was 17.15 years. Statistically significant differences were observed between genders related to alcohol drinking (p<0.0001). Significant linear relationships were shown between smoking and alcohol consumption (r2=0.47, p<0.0001).

Conclusion

There was a clear difference in smoking and alcohol consumption between groups of Romanian dental students.

Citation

Dumitrescu AL. Attitudes of Romanian Dental Students Towards Tobacco and Alcohol. J Contemp Dent Pract 2007 March;(8)3:064-071.


PDF Share
  1. Smoking and disease. Eur J Dent Educ. 2004;8:7-10.
  2. Approaches to tobacco control: the evidence base. Eur J Dent Educ. 2004;8:11-7.
  3. Tobacco control and the role of the medical community in the Slovak Republic. Eur J Dent Educ. 2004;8:46-50.
  4. Smoking Statistics 28 May 2002 http://www.wpro.who.int/media_centre/fact_sheets/fs_20020528.htm
  5. Mortality from smoking in developed countries 1950-2000 (2nd edition, 23 August 2004). Available at: http://www.ctsu.ox.ac.uk/~tobacco/
  6. The role of the dental team in tobacco cessation. Eur J Dent Educ. 2004;8:18-24.
  7. Treatment of tobacco use and dependence: the role of the dental professional. J Dent Educ. 2005;69:521-37.
  8. Physician and dentist tobacco use counseling and adolescent smoking behavior: results from the 2000 National Youth Tobacco Survey. Pediatrics. 2005;115:719-25.
  9. Barriers limiting dentists’ active involvement in smoking cessation. Oral Health Prev Dent. 2004;2:95-102.
  10. Engineering clinician leadership and success in tobacco control: recommendations for policy and practice in Hungary and Central Europe. Eur J Dent Educ. 2004;8:51-60.
  11. Paradigm shifts in medical and dental education: behavioural sciences and behavioural medicine. Eur J Dent Educ. 2004;8:25-31.
  12. Greek dental students’ attitudes toward tobacco control programmes. Int Dent J. 2004;54:119-25.
  13. The association between emotional intelligence and early adolescent tobacco and alcohol use. Pers Individ Dif. 2002;32:95-10. 2004;197:89-93.
  14. Exposure to tobacco smoking and periodontal health. J Clin Periodontol. 2000;27:61-68.
  15. A comparison of sensation-seeking between dental and biological science students. Eur J Dent Educ. 2003;7:171-6.
  16. ‘It's difficult being a dentist’: stress and health in the general dental practitioner. Br Dent J. 2004; 197: 89-93.
  17. Psychosocial and professional characteristics of burnout in Swiss primary care practitioners: a cross-sectional survey. Swiss Med Wkly. 2005;135:101-8.
  18. Levels of burnout in general dental practitioners in the south-east of England. Br Dent J. 1994;177:372-7.
  19. Physical and psychosocial stress exposures in US dental schools: the need for expanded ergonomics training. Appl Ergon. 2004;35:153-7.
  20. Psychological stress in undergraduate dental students: baseline results from seven European dental schools. Eur J Dent Educ. 2002;6:22-9.
  21. Emotional intelligence and perceived stress in dental undergraduates. J Dent Educ. 2003;67:1023-8.
  22. Emotional intelligence and stress coping in dental undergraduates╌a qualitative study. Br Dent J. 2004;197:205-9.
  23. Sources of stress and psychological disturbance among dental students in the West Indies. J Dent Educ. 2002;66:1021-30.
  24. Psychological well-being and perceptions of stress amongst Japanese dental students. Eur J Dent Educ. 2005;9:17-25.
  25. Stress, burnout and health in the clinical period of dental education. Eur J Dent Educ. 2005;9:78-84.
  26. Attitudes of Hungarian healthcare professional students to tobacco and alcohol. Eur J Dent Educ. 2004;8:32-5.
  27. The changing patterns of drinking, illicit drug use, stress, anxiety and depression in dental students in a UK dental school: a longitudinal study. Br Dental J. 2002;192:646-649.
  28. Alcohol and drug use among vocational dental practitioners. Br Dent J. 2003;195:265-8.
  29. Student addiction. Br Dental J. 2002;193:243.
  30. Application of behavioural sciences teaching by UK dental undergraduates. Eur J Dent Educ. 2000; 4: 49-56.
PDF Share

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.