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VOLUME 9 , ISSUE 5 ( July, 2008 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Preparedness for Management of Medical Emergencies Among Dentists in Udupi and Mangalore, India

Tanupriya Gupta, M.R. Shankar Aradhya, N. Anup

Citation Information : Gupta T, Aradhya MS, Anup N. Preparedness for Management of Medical Emergencies Among Dentists in Udupi and Mangalore, India. J Contemp Dent Pract 2008; 9 (5):92-99.

DOI: 10.5005/jcdp-9-5-92

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Published Online: 01-07-2008

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2008; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to assess the preparedness for management of medical emergencies among dentists in the cities of Udupi and Mangalore in India.

Methods and Materials

A self-administered questionnaire was completed by the dental teaching hospital faculty members and private dental practitioners in Udupi and Mangalore, India.

Results

Less than half (42.1%) of the dentists reported having received practical training in management of medical emergencies during their undergraduate and postgraduate education. Only about one-third of the respondents felt competent in performing mouth-to-mouth breathing (39.3%), cardiac compression (35.2%), foreign body obstruction relief (32.8%), and in administering IV drugs (34.5%) or supplemental oxygen (27.4%). The most commonly available emergency drugs in treatment areas were oral glucose (82.2%) and adrenaline (65.8%). However, less than one-fourth of the respondents had the following on hand in their treatment facility: oxygen (24.0%), an AMBU bag (17.1%), pocket mask (13.0%), bronchodilator spray (24.7%), diazepam (20.5%), aspirin (20.5%), and glyceryl trinitrate (17.8%). Less than half (39%) of the respondents reported having clinical staff members trained to assist in emergency recognition and management and only 5.8% carried out emergency drills in their workplace.

Conclusion

Preparedness for management of medical emergencies was found to be inadequate among the surveyed dentists.

Clinical significance

The results of the study emphasize the need for improvement of the training of practicing dentists in the management of medical emergencies at the undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing education levels as well as the need for organization of the dental workplace to handle such emergencies.

Citation

Gupta T, Aradhya S, Anup N. Preparedness for Management of Medical Emergencies Among Dentists in Udupi and Mangalore, India. J Contemp Dent Pract 2008 July; (9)5:092-099.


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