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VOLUME 16 , ISSUE 2 ( February, 2015 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Facial Injuries: A Comparative Study

HP Raghuveer, NT Prashanth, R Dilip Kumar, ES Shobha, Vinod Rangan, Baswaraj Hullale

Citation Information : Raghuveer H, Prashanth N, Kumar RD, Shobha E, Rangan V, Hullale B. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Facial Injuries: A Comparative Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015; 16 (2):118-125.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1647

Published Online: 00-02-2015

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2015; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

The aim of the study was to identify the presence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients who had sustained facial injuries, additionally, we aimed to identify other variables that may modify the psychological response to trauma that include gender, age and presence of disfigurement posttreatment and visible scars/orthopedic injuries.

Materials and methods

Participants comprised of 460 patients from several multinodal trauma centers in Bengaluru City, Karnataka, who had sustained facial injuries that had healed either with or without significant disfigurement or scarring and with visible/orthopedic injuries. One hundred and eleven patients of the chosen 460 had sustained nondisfiguring facial injuries while 153 patients sustained disfiguring facial injuries, 64 patients who sustained facial injury (i.e. 19.5%) were lost to follow-up and were not included in the study. One hundred and thirty-two had sustained orthopedic/visible injuries; however, in this group, 18 (i.e. 13.6%) patients were lost to follow-up and were excluded from the study. The impact of events scale (IES) was used to check the presence of PTSD.

Results

Statistically significant higher means of IES were present in patients with disfiguring facial injuries compared to nondisfiguring facial injuries, female patients compared to male patients, patients with disfiguring facial injuries compared to orthopedic/visible injuries and patients who were younger than 50 years of age compared to patients who were older than 50 years of age and the results observed were similar at all three study intervals (date of discharge (DOD), 1 month and 6 months postoperatively).

Conclusion

Patients with disfiguring facial injuries had significantly higher PTSD levels compared to patients with nondisfiguring facial injuries, patients with orthopedic/visible injuries had statistically significant lower IES scores which could not be strictly termed PTSD when compared to patients with disfiguring facial injuries who had high scores of IES corresponding to high levels of PTSD and these results were observed at all three study intervals (DOD, 1 and 6 months postoperatively). Female patients with disfiguring facial injuries had significantly higher PTSD levels compared to male patients (at all the study intervals) and patients younger than 50 years of age had significantly higher PTSD levels compared to older patients.

How to cite this article

Prashanth NT, Raghuveer HP, Kumar RD, Shobha ES, Rangan V, Hullale B. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Facial Injuries: A Comparative Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(2):118-125.


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