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VOLUME 14 , ISSUE 3 ( May-June, 2013 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

The Prevalence of Dental Anomalies in Orthodontic Patients at the State University of New York at Buffalo

Athari Al-Amiri, Sawsan Tabbaa, Charles Brian Preston, Thikriat Al-Jewair

Citation Information : Al-Amiri A, Tabbaa S, Preston CB, Al-Jewair T. The Prevalence of Dental Anomalies in Orthodontic Patients at the State University of New York at Buffalo. J Contemp Dent Pract 2013; 14 (3):518-523.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1354

Published Online: 01-06-2013

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2013; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Objective

To determine the prevalence of permanent tooth anomalies in patients attending the graduate orthodontic clinic at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

Materials and methods

Charts of 496 subjects (310 females and 186 males) met the inclusion criteria for this study. The mean ages were 16 years and 3 months for the combined gender sample that received orthodontic treatment in the graduate orthodontic clinic between 2007 and 2010. Full pretreatment records (intraoral photographs, digital study models, lateral cephalograms and panoramic radiographs) were used for the assessment. Charts were examined for these anomalies: agenesis, supernumerary, impaction and delayed tooth eruption. Subjects were categorized by gender and ethnicity. The percentages of the anomalies were assessed according to type of malocclusion, gender, race, location, tooth class and region in the dental arches.

Results

Sixty-four subjects (12.9%) had at least one occurrence of delayed eruption and impaction (DEI), followed by 47 subjects (9.5%) who had at least one occurrence of agenesis, and seven (1.4%) had a supernumerary condition. Approximately 80% of the subjects had no dental anomalies. The presence of more than one anomaly was observed in 61 subjects. Twelve subjects (2.4%) had both agenesis and DEI. Agenesis tended to be more common in class II malocclusions (p = 0.012).

Conclusion

The prevalence of permanent tooth anomalies was (20.4%). The percentage occurrence of DEI was the highest (12.9%) followed by dental agenesis (9.5%) and supernumerary teeth (1.4%) in the orthodontic patients at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

How to cite this article

Al-Amiri A, Tabbaa S, Preston CB, Al-Jewair T. The Prevalence of Dental Anomalies in Orthodontic Patients at the State University of New York at Buffalo. J Contemp Dent Pract 2013;14(3):518-523.


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