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VOLUME 9 , ISSUE 1 ( January, 2008 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Epilepsy and the Dental Management of the Epileptic Patient

Peter L. Jacobsen, Oleksandra Eden

Citation Information : Jacobsen PL, Eden O. Epilepsy and the Dental Management of the Epileptic Patient. J Contemp Dent Pract 2008; 9 (1):54-62.

DOI: 10.5005/jcdp-9-1-54

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Published Online: 01-01-2008

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2008; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

The aim of this article is to educate oral healthcare providers on the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy and seizure disorders. It also shows the impact of epilepsy on the oral cavity and provides suggestions on the dental management of epileptic patients.

Review

Epilepsy and seizure disorders affect 1.5 million Americans. The disease is caused by a number of genetic, physiologic, and infectious disorders as well as trauma. Treatment is primarily pharmaceutical but can also be surgical. The disease itself and the pharmaceutical management often have an impact on the oral cavity. Primary management considerations are the provision of good periodontal care and the restoration of the teeth with stable, strong restorations.

Conclusions

With proper understanding of patients with epilepsy and seizure disorders and their medical treatment, the dental care team can safely and effectively render dental care that will benefit the patient and minimize the risk of oral health problems in the future.

Citation

Jacobsen PL, Eden O. Epilepsy and the Dental Management of the Epileptic Patient. J Contemp Dent Pract 2008 January; (9)1:054-062.


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