The Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice

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2015 | April | Volume 16 | Issue 4

EDITORIAL

Roopa Rao, Thirumal Raj

Animal Models—Decoding the Molecular Biology of Oral Cancer

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:1] [Pages No:0 - 0]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jcdp-16-4-i  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Benjamin Mahmoodi, Jens Weusmann, Adriano Azaripour, Benedikt Braun, Christian Walter, Brita Willershausen

Odontogenic Infections: A 1-year Retrospective Study

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:6] [Pages No:253 - 258]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1671  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, demographic patterns and management of odontogenic infections in patients undergoing treatment in an outpatient dental emergency service of a university hospital.

Materials and methods

In a retrospective study of the year 2012, all patients suffering from odontogenic infections were included. Demographic data, diagnosis and the conducted treatment were analyzed. Odontogenic infections were defined as pulpitis, apical and marginal periodontitis, abscesses and pericoronitis.

Results

A total of 2,058 out of 4,209 emergency patients suffered from odontogenic infections. The majority (45.0%) had an apical periodontitis, 20.8% abscesses, 17.3% a marginal periodontitis, 16.3% a pulpitis and 5.8% a pericoronitis. Mean age was 37.5 ± 17.0 years standard deviation (SD) (1.2-96.4). Most patients were 20 to 29 years (24.6%), followed by the age group of 30 to 39 year old patients (21.0%). Males were affected more frequently (55.5%) than females (45.5%). Most of the patients (64.5%) of the patients received a dental or surgical treatment. Antibiotics were prescribed in 31.7% of cases. Amoxicillin was the most common prescribed antibiotic (54.5%).

Conclusion

Odontogenic infections represent one of the main reasons for consulting the emergency service. Due to the high number of cases and the severe complications, dentists have to be familiar with the surgical management of odontogenic infections as well as the appropriate use of antibiotics.

Clinical significance

Nearly half of all patients who sought, treatment in the emergency service had an odontogenic infectious disease. This should be considered for the organization and planning of the service.

How to cite this article

Mahmoodi B, Weusmann J, Azaripour A, Braun B, Walter C, Willershausen B. Odontogenic Infections: A 1-year Retrospective Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):253-258.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez, Leily Macedo Firoozmand, Matheus Coelho Bandeca, Shilpa H Bhandi, Fausto Silva Bramante, Washington Luís Machado dos Reis, Mercêdes Aroucha Vieira, Adriana Gomes Nunes, Regina Vieira de Oliveira Roma

Can Whitening Strips interfere with the Bond Strength of Composite Resins?

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:5] [Pages No:259 - 263]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1672  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the bond strength of composite resins on enamel previously treated with whitening strips.

Materials and methods

A total of 48 bovine incisors were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 12 each): G1 (WSC)— treated with 9.5% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips (3D White Whitestrips® Advanced Vivid/CREST); G2 (WSO)—treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips (3D WhiteTM/Oral B); G3 (WG)—treated with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide gel with fluorine, calcium and potassium nitrate (White Class®/FGM); and G4 (C)—control not subjected to bleaching treatment. The specimens were subjected to bleaching over 2 weeks following the manufacturers’ instructions. Following the elaboration of the composite resin test specimens, the samples were stored in artificial saliva and subsequently subjected to the microshear test using the universal testing machine (EMIC®). The bond strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's statistical test (5%).

Results

Significant differences were observed among the investigated groups (p < 0.05). The G3-WG exhibited greater values compared with the control group and the groups treated with strips, G1-WSC and G2-WSO. Analysis of the bond interface revealed that a large fraction of the failures occurred at the enamel-resin interface.

Conclusion

The bond strength decreased following 14 days of treatment with bleaching strips, whereas the whitening gel with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide, calcium and fluorine increased the bond strength.

How to cite this article

Firoozmand LM, dos Reis WLM, Vieira MA, Nunes AG, de Jesus Tavarez RR, Tonetto MR, Bramante FS, Bhandi SH, de Oliveira Roma RV, Bandeca MC. Can Whitening Strips interfere with the Bond Strength of Composite Resins? J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):259-263.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Elijah Olufemi Oyetola, Foluso John Owotade, Gbemisola Adewumi Agbelusi, Olawumi Fatusi, Abubakar Sanusi, Olufunlola M Adesina

Salivary Flow Rates of Nigerian Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Case-control Study

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:6] [Pages No:264 - 269]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1673  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aims and objectives

The study determined the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and changes in salivary flow and the complications of reduced salivary flow among African subjects with CKD compared with the controls.

Materials and methods

One hundred and eighty patients, 90 CKD and 90 controls were recruited, interviewed and examined. Stimulated and unstimulated saliva collection was done with standardized spitting method. Urinalysis and blood creatinine levels were determined and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of each patient was calculated from the blood creatinine using Cockcroft and Gault formula. Statistical analysis was done using STATA 11 software.

Results

The mean stimulated and unstimulated whole salivary flow rate among CKD subjects were 4.07 ± 1.91 and 2.34 ± 0.99 ml/5 min respectively and is significantly lower than that of the controls which were 8.05 ± 3.95 ml/5 min and 3.82 ± 2.27 ml/5 min for stimulated and unstimulated flow rates. Oral signs of reduced salivary flow were found in 80% of CKD patients. The commonest oral finding was taste abnormalities others are burning sensation, halitosis and difficulty in mastication.

Conclusion

Patients with CKD had reduced stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate. Reduced salivary flow was associated with oral lesions in majority (80%) of CKD patients, the commonest finding being taste abnormalities.

How to cite this article

Oyetola EO, Owotade FJ, Agbelusi GA, Fatusi O, Sanusi A, Adesina OM. Salivary Flow Rates of Nigerian Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Case-control Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):264-269.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Soghra Yassaei, Azadeh Soleimanian, Zahra Ebrahimi Nik

Effects of Diode Laser Debonding of Ceramic Brackets on Enamel Surface and Pulpal Temperature

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:5] [Pages No:270 - 274]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1674  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

Debonding of ceramic brackets due to their high bond strength and low fracture toughness is one of the most challenging complications of orthodontic clinicians. Application of lasers might be effective in the debonding of ceramic brackets as they reduce bond strength of resins and, therefore, can eliminate the risk of enamel damage. However, the thermal effects of laser radiation on dental tissue can cause undesirable results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the enamel surface characteristics and pulpal temperature changes of teeth after debonding of ceramic brackets with or without laser light.

Materials and methods

Thirty polycrystalline brackets were bonded to 30 intact extracted premolars, and later debonded conventionally or through a diode laser (2.5 W, 980 nm). The laser was applied for 10 seconds with sweeping movement. After debonding, the adhesive remnant index (ARI), the lengths and frequency of enamel cracks were compared among the groups. The increase in intrapulpal temperature was also measured. The collected data were analyzed by Chi-squared test and paired t-test using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software.

Results

There was no case of enamel fracture in none of the groups. Laser debonding caused a significant decrease in the frequency and lengths of enamel cracks, compared to conventional debonding. In laser debonding group, the increase in intrapulpal temperature (1.46°C) was significantly below the benchmark of 5.5°C for all the specimens. No significant difference was observed in ARI scores among the groups.

Conclusion

Laser-assisted debonding of ceramic brackets could reduce the risk of enamel damage, without causing thermal damage to the pulp. However, some increases in the length and frequency of enamel cracks should be expected with all debonding methods.

How to cite this article

Yassaei S, Soleimanian A, Nik ZE. Effects of Diode Laser Debonding of Ceramic Brackets on Enamel Surface and Pulpal Temperature. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):270-274.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Mohammad Sami Ahmad

Oral Health Knowledge and Attitude among Primary School Teachers of Madinah, Saudi Arabia

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:5] [Pages No:275 - 279]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1675  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Background and objective

Effect of oral health knowledge and attitude has direct effect on school children so aim of this study is to know the oral health knowledge and attitude among primary school teachers.

Materials and methods

This was a cross-sectional questionnaire based survey done in 2014. Four males and three females schools were selected using a convenience sampling method. Among them, three were private and the rest was government schools. Approval was obtained from the selected schools. One hundred twenty self-administered questionnaires in Arabic language were distributed among the primary school teachers.

Results

Completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 95%. Among the teachers, 57% were males and rests were females. The mean age was 36.1 years (SD ± 6.9). Sixty-eight percent were between 31 and 40 years old and among them female showed high score for oral health knowledge (80%) p < 0.001 whereas male showed high score of attitude (82%) p < 0.05. Thirty-three percent had 5 and 10 years of teaching experience. Ninety-eight percent were graduate or above. Eighty-nine percent had used toothbrush. There was no significant relation between the teaching experience and the oral health knowledge (p = 0.14) but there was a significant relation between teaching experience and attitude (p = 0.001). In this sample, irrespective of their frequency of tooth brushing, a significant number had good knowledge (p < 0.001) and highly acceptable attitudes (p = 0.001) toward oral health.

Conclusion

Primary school teachers had acceptable knowledge and attitudes regarding their oral health. Further studies are needed to evaluate and compare their oral health status to their knowledge and attitudes and to determine whether they offer oral health education to the school children.

How to cite this article

Ahmad MS. Oral Health Knowledge and Attitude among Primary School Teachers of Madinah, Saudi Arabia. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):275-279.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto, Milton Carlos Kuga, Fausto Frizzera, Matheus Coelho Bandeca, Shilpa H Bhandi, Célia Regina Maio Pinzan-Vercelino, Monica Barros da Silva, Kamila Figueiredo Pereira

Semidirect Restorations in Multidisciplinary Treatment: Viable Option for Children and Teenagers

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:4] [Pages No:280 - 283]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1676  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Tonetto MR, Frizzera F, da Silva MB, Bhandi SH, Kuga MC, Pereira KF, Pinzan-Vercelino CRM, Bandéca MC. Semidirect Restorations in Multidisciplinary Treatment: Viable Option for Children and Teenagers. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):280-283.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Elmira Jafari Navimipour, Fatemeh Sadat Mirhashemi

Finite Element Analysis of the Endodontically-treated Maxillary Premolars restored with Composite Resin along with Glass Fiber Insertion in Various Positions

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:7] [Pages No:284 - 290]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1677  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

This study evaluated the effect of three methods of glass fiber insertion on stress distribution pattern and cusp movement of the root-filled maxillary premolars using finite element method (FEM) analysis.

Materials and methods

A three-dimensional (3D) FEM model of a sound upper premolar tooth and four models of root-filled upper premolars with mesiocclusodistal (MOD) cavities were molded and restored with: (1) Composite resin only (NF); (2) Composite resin along with a ribbon of glass fiber placed in the occlusal third (OF); (3) Composite resin along with a ribbon of glass fiber placed circumferentially in the cervical third (CF), and (4) Composite resin along with occlusal and circumferential fibers (OCF). A static vertical load was applied to calculate the stress distributions. Structural analysis program by Solidworks were used for FEM analysis. Von-Mises stress values and cusp movements induced by occlusal loading were evaluated.

Results

Maximum Von-Mises stress of enamel occurred in sound tooth, followed by NF, CF, OF and OCF. Maximum Von- Mises stress of dentin occurred in sound tooth, followed by OF, OCF, CF and NF. Stress distribution patterns of OF and OCF were similar. Maximum overall stress values were concentrated in NF. Although stress distribution patterns of NF and CF were found as similar, CF showed lower stress values. Palatal cusp movement was more than buccal cusp in all of the models.

Conclusion

The results of our study indicated that while the circumferential fiber had little effect on overall stress concentration, it provided a more favorable stress distribution pattern in cervical region. The occlusal fiber reduced the average stress in the entire structure but did not reduce cuspal movement.

Clinical significance

Incorporating glass fiber in composite restorations may alter the stress state within the structure depending on fiber position.

How to cite this article

Navimipour EJ, Firouzmandi M, Mirhashemi FS. Finite Element Analysis of the Endodonticallytreated Maxillary Premolars restored with Composite Resin along with Glass Fiber Insertion in Various Positions. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):284-290.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Roghayeh Ghorbanzadeh, Babak Pourakbari, Abbas Bahador

Effects of Baseplates of Orthodontic Appliances with in situ generated Silver Nanoparticles on Cariogenic Bacteria: A Randomized, Doubleblind Cross-over Clinical Trial

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:8] [Pages No:291 - 298]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1678  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is commonly used primarily for baseplates of orthodontic appliances (BOA). The activities of cariogenic bacteria in biofilm on these surfaces may contribute to dental caries, gingival inflammation and periodontal disease. The PMMA incorporated with nanoparticles of silver (NanoAg-I-PMMA) and NanoAg in situ in PMMA (NanoAg-IS-PMMA) have been shown to control the growth of cariogenic bacteria, but clinical trial of anti-cariogenic application of these novel materials in orthodontics has not been evaluated. The main aim of the study is to compare the clinical effectiveness of using NanoAg-IS-PMMA and NanoAg-I-PMMA for construction of new BOA in inhibiting the planktonic growth and biofilm formation of the cariogenic bacteria.

Materials and methods

Twenty four patients with a median age of 12.6 years (7-15) harboring Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus and Lactobacillus acidophilus as well as Lactobacillus casei participated in the randomized, doubleblind, cross-over study. The experimental BOA, NanoAg-ISBOA and NanoAg-I-BOA, contained 0.5% w/w NanoAg while the control BOA was standard PMMA. Antibacterial effect of NanoAg-IS-BOA and NanoAg-I-BOA was assessed against test cariogenic bacteria by planktonic and biofilm bacterial cells growth inhibition.

Results

The average levels of test cariogenic bacteria in saliva decreased about 2 to 70 fold (30.9-98.4%) compared to baseline depending on the microorganism type and test BOA. Biofilm inhibition analysis demonstrated that NanoAg-I-BOA and NanoAg-IS-BOA inhibited the biofilm of all test bacteria by 20.1 to 79.9% compared to BOA. NanoAg-IS-BOA had a strong anti-biofilm effect against S. mutans, S. sobrinus and L. casei. However, NanoAg-I-BOA showed only slight antibiofilm effects on test bacteria. Most notably, at all period of the clinical trial, NanoAg-IS-BOA showed a higher antibacterial activity than NanoAg-I-BOA.

Conclusion

Based on the novel data that presented here, the NanoAg-IS-BOA had strong antimicrobial activity in the planktonic phase and subsequent biofilm formation of the cariogenic bacteria.

Clinical significance

Wearing of NanoAg-IS-BOA has the potential to minimize dental plaque formation and caries during orthodontic treatment.

How to cite this article

Ghorbanzadeh R, Pourakbari B, Bahador A. Effects of Baseplates of Orthodontic Appliances with in situ generated Silver Nanoparticles on Cariogenic Bacteria: A Randomized, Double-blind Cross-over Clinical Trial. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):291-298.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Mohammad Khursheed Alam, Fazal Shahid, Kathiravan Purmal, MA Sikder, Mohammed Saifuddin

Human Mesiodistal Tooth Width Measurements and Comparison with Dental Cast in a Bangladeshi Population

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:5] [Pages No:299 - 303]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1679  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

This analysis was aimed to determine the mesiodistal tooth width of human teeth and to compare with the measurements on plaster model in a Bangladeshi population.

Materials and methods

The samples of 2,892 teeth of Bangladeshi subjects were collected for this purpose. This article presents mesiodistal tooth width measurements made on all types of teeth and compares with the mesiodistal tooth width measurements of dental cast collected from Bangladeshi subjects between the ages of 18 and 24 years. The mesiodistal dimension was recorded, involving the maximum mesiodistal dimension of each tooth when measurement was rendered parallel to the occlusal and labial surfaces. Descriptive and comparative statistics were applied.

Results

The mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval of mesiodistal tooth width measurements were determined and have been with the mesiodistal tooth width measurements of dental cast. Significant differences have been observed between mesiodistal tooth size of direct measurement on tooth (DMT) and measurement on plaster model (MPM) for the maxillary first molar (p < 0.001) and mandibular incisors to first premolar (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

These data should prove to be helpful to the practitioner for performing successful orthodontic treatment in Bangladeshi population.

Clinical significance

Direct measurement of mesiodistal tooth width and individual variation of maxillary and mandibular permanent central incisor to first molar of the Bangladeshi individuals showed some distinguishable features, which will certainly help an orthodontist for diagnosis and treatment plan of an orthodontic case.

How to cite this article

Alam MK, Shahid F, Purmal K, Sikder MA, Saifuddin M. Human Mesiodistal Tooth Width Measurements and Comparison with Dental Cast in a Bangladeshi Population. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):299-303.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

N Meena, Deepak Mehta, Noor Saira Wajid Najma Hajira, P Ashwini, HL Usha

Influence of Different Enamel Shades and Thickness on Chroma and Value of Dentin Vita Shade: An in vitro Comparative Assessment Study

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:6] [Pages No:304 - 309]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1680  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Background

The aim of the present study is to determine the influence of different enamel shades of various thickness on chroma and value of vita shade of dentin.

Materials and methods

Three enamel composite resin shades (Enamel white, grey and neutral) and one dentin shade (A2) from Amelogen Plus (Ultradent) was used. Ninety Enamel disk specimens of 0.5, 0.75 and 1 mm thickness and 10 mm in diameter for each shade and 90 dentin disk specimens of 2 mm in thickness and 10 mm in diameter was used for the study. The spectrophotometric values of the dentin shade with and without enamel specimens were recorded and the values were converted to CIE L*a*b values.

Results

Statistical analysis was done using Pearson correlation coefficients to verify the effect of thickness on Chroma and value, and the significance was evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. Two way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc was done to verify the variation within the groups. Results revealed a significant positive correlation between thickness and chroma and a negative correlation between thickness and value. There was a statistically significant variation in between the groups.

Conclusion

All groups produced a significant increase in chroma with increase in thickness of enamel shade upto a thickness of 0.75 mm after which the behavior of each shade was erratic. Hence, the optimum thickness would be 0.75 mm. All groups produced a significant decrease in value with increase in thickness of enamel shade. Enamel white produced the greatest reduction in value, enamel neutral the least and enamel grey demonstrated an intermediate result.

Clinical significance

There is a need to have a knowledge of the effect on chroma and value when dentin is layered with different enamel shades, it is also important to understand the effect of these enamel shades at different thicknesses to better control the color and reproduce esthetic simulating natural teeth.

How to cite this article

Hajira NSWN, Mehta D, Ashwini P, Meena N, Usha HL. Influence of Different Enamel Shades and Thickness on Chroma and Value of Dentin Vita Shade: An in vitro Comparative Assessment Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):304-309.

REVIEW ARTICLE

Hamid Jafarzadeh, Zahed Mohammadi, Sousan Shalavi, Shilpa Bandi

Root and Root Canal Morphology of Human Third Molar Teeth

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:4] [Pages No:310 - 313]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1681  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Mohammadi Z, Jafarzadeh H, Shalavi S, Bandi S, Patil SG. Root and Root Canal Morphology of Human Third Molar Teeth. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4): 310-313.

REVIEW ARTICLE

Farouk Ahmed Hussein

Advances in Soft Denture Liners: An Update

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:5] [Pages No:314 - 318]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1682  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Hashem MI. Advances in Soft Denture Liners: An Update. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):314-318.

CASE REPORT

Yousef A AlJehani

Nonsurgical Management of Phenytoin-induced Gingival Hyperplasia

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:3] [Pages No:319 - 321]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1683  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

The aim of this report is to present a severe case of phenytoin (PHT)-induced gingival hyperplasia in a Saudi patient.

Materials and methods

A 12-year-old male epileptic patient, undergoing PHT therapy, was diagnosed clinically with severe gingival hyperplasia. His treatment consisted meticulous oral care and weekly professional prophylaxis. The patient was advised oral folic acid supplementation (0.5 mg/day) and was also recommended 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash twice daily.

Results

There was significant reduction in the hyperplastic tissue within 4 weeks of treatment.

Conclusion

It is possible to treat PHT-induced gingival hyperplasia non-surgically with intensive dental care, correct oral hygiene and oral folic acid supplements.

How to cite this article

AlJehani YA. Nonsurgical Management of Phenytoin-induced Gingival Hyperplasia. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):319-321.

CASE REPORT

Maria Luiza Diniz de Sousa Lopes, Ana Rafaela Luz de Aquino, Maria de Lourdes Silva de Arruda Morais, Lélia Bristo de Medeiros, Éricka Janine Dantas da Silveira

Multiple Second Primary Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas in a Nonsmoker and Nondrinker Woman: Case Report and Review of the Literature

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:7] [Pages No:322 - 328]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1684  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

This manuscript aims to describe an unusual case of multiple second primary squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in several sites of the oral mucosa in a nonsmoker and nondrinker woman and to discuss the diagnostic criteria, clinicopathological aspects and outcome of second primary tumor (SPT).

Background

Patients treated for SCC of the head and neck are at high risk for developing SPT arising from the same dysplastic mucosal field. Currently, there is no reliable method to predict which of the patients will develop SPT.

Case description

A 64-year-old nonsmoker and nondrinker woman developed several second primary oral SCCs in 7 years of follow-up, most of them being synchronic, treated by surgery without and with chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Conclusion

Patients treated for SCC require a long-term and careful follow-up as the development of SPT contributes with significantly negative impact on the prognosis.

Clinical significance

This report describes the diagnosis and management of a very unusual case of several SPTs affecting different sites of the oral mucosa in the same patient. Moreover, the patient had no apparent risk factors associated with the development of the oral cancer. Therefore, a brief update concerning SPT and its diagnosis and management is also provided.

How to cite this article

de Sousa Lopes MLD, de Aquino ARL, de Arruda Morais MLS, de Medeiros LB, da Silveira EJD. Multiple Second Primary Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas in a Nonsmoker and Nondrinker Woman: Case Report and Review of the Literature. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):322-328.

CASE REPORT

Matheus Coelho Bandéca, Shilpa H Bhandi, Monica Barros da Silva, Rafael Travassos, Bruno Soares, José Carlos Elias Mouchrek, Vanessa Camila da Silva, Bruno Braga Benatti

Multidisciplinary Treatment of a Fenestration-type Defect

[Year:2015] [Month:April] [Volume:16] [Number:4] [Pages:6] [Pages No:329 - 334]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1685  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Travassos R, Soares B, Bhandi SH, da Silva MB, Bandéca MC, Mouchrek Jr JCE, da Silva VC, Benatti BB. Multidisciplinary Treatment of a Fenestration-type Defect. J Contemp Dent Pract 2015;16(4):329-334.

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