The Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice

Register      Login

Table of Content

2016 | November | Volume 17 | Issue 11

EDITORIAL

Seyed Amir Danesh-Sani

Multidisciplinary Management of Candidates for Maxillary Sinus Augmentation by a Surgeon and ENT Specialist

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:3] [Pages No:881 - 883]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1947  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Danesh-Sani SA. Multidisciplinary Management of Candidates for Maxillary Sinus Augmentation by a Surgeon and ENT Specialist. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):881-883.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Ahmad S Burhan, Fehmieh R Nawaya

Use of the Tooth Coronal Pulp Index for Recognition of the Pubertal Growth Period

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:6] [Pages No:884 - 889]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1948  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

The present study aimed to investigate the association between the tooth coronal index (TCI) and the pubertal growth stages (PGS) for children and adolescents.

Materials and methods

A cross-sectional study was performed using retrospectively collected panoramic and hand-wrist radiographs of 262 individuals (125 males, 137 females). The coronal height (CH) and the coronal pulp cavity height (CPCH) of the left mandibular teeth were measured. Then the TCI for which was calculated according to Ikeda et al (1985). The estimated TCI for individuals with the following PGS after Fishman (1987) are: SMI 4 (S), SMI 5 (DP3 cap), SMI 6 (MP3 cap) and SMI 7 (Mp5 cap). The associations between the TCI and the PGS were investigated by correlation coefficient of Spearman's rho, and the validity values for the PGS were computed.

Results

Significant correlations were noted between the simple TCI values for premolars and molars and the PGS, and the highest correlation was for the summed TCI for both first and second molars. Utilizing the validity values of the summed TCI for both first and second mandibular molars, the PGS can be predicted as follows: S stage when TCI is 49.17 or lesser, DP3cap stage when TCI is 43.52 or lesser, MP3cap stage when TCI is 36.73 or lesser, and Mp5cap stage when TCI is 26.84 or lesser.

Conclusion

The TCI values declined along with the maturational process in children and adolescents. The TCI for both first and second molars was the best predictor of the PGS.

Clinical significance

Panoramic photographs can be beneficial for prediction of the skeletal maturity and treatment planning without resorting to hand-wrist radiographs.

How to cite this article

Nawaya FR, Burhan AS. Use of the Tooth Coronal Pulp Index for Recognition of the Pubertal Growth Period. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):884-889.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Lorenzo Cinci, Laura Pieri, Alessandro Leonida, Giovanni Todeschini, Giovanni Lomartire

Socket Preservation using Enzyme-treated Equine Bone Granules and an Equine Collagen Matrix: A Case Report with Histological and Histomorphometrical Assessment

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:7] [Pages No:890 - 896]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1949  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

To histologically assess the effectiveness of a socketpreservation technique using enzyme-treated equine bone granules as a bone-graft material in combination with an equine collagen matrix as a scaffold for soft-tissue regeneration.

Background

Enzyme-treated equine bone granules and equine collagen matrix recently have been developed to help overcome alveolar bone deficiencies that develop in the wake of edentulism.

Case report

The patient had one mandibular molar extracted and the socket grafted with equine bone granules. The graft was covered with the equine collagen matrix, placed in a double layer. No flap was prepared, and the gingival margins were stabilized with a single stitch, leaving the matrix partially exposed and the site to heal by secondary intention. The adjacent molar was extracted 1 month later, and that socket was left to heal by secondary intention without any further treatment. Three months after each surgery, an implant was placed and a biopsy was collected. The two biopsies underwent histological processing and qualitative evaluation. Histomorphometric analysis was also performed to calculate the percentage of newly formed bone (NFB) in the two cores. Healing at both sites was uneventful, and no inflammation or other adverse reactions were observed in the samples. Soft-tissue healing by secondary intention appeared to occur faster at the grafted site. The corresponding core showed a marked separation between soft and hard tissue that was not observed in the core from the nongrafted site, where soft-tissue hypertrophy could be observed. Newly formed bone at the grafted and nongrafted sites was not significantly different (27.2 ± 7.1 and 29.4 ± 6.2% respectively, p=0.45).

Conclusion

The surgical technique employed in this case appeared to facilitate postextraction soft-tissue healing by second intention and simplify soft-tissue management.

Clinical significance

Using a collagen-based matrix to cover a postextraction grafted site may facilitate second intention soft-tissue healing and proper soft-tissue growth.

How to cite this article

Leonida A, Todeschini G, Lomartire G, Cinci L, Pieri L. Socket Preservation using Enzyme-treated Equine Bone Granules and an Equine Collagen Matrix: A Case Report with Histological and Histomorphometrical Assessment. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):890-896.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Hanan N Al-Otaibi

Intended and Achieved Torque of Implant Abutment's Screw using Manual Wrenches in Simulated Clinical Setting

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:5] [Pages No:897 - 901]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1950  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Objective

To measure the difference between the intended torque and the achieved torque by the operator using the springstyle mechanical torque-limiting device (MTLD).

Materials and methods

Inexperienced and experienced clinicians used one spring-type MTLD to torque two abutment screws of each anterior and posterior implants, which were attached to two digital torque meters through a jaw model. The jaw model was part of a preclinical bench manikin attached to a dental chair. The intended torque value was 35 N cm (recommended by manufacturer) and the technique of torquing was observed for all the participants (instantaneous and repeated). The mean torque value was calculated for each subject for the anterior and posterior implants independently; t-test was used to compare between the intended and achieved torque values and to compare between the experienced and inexperienced clinicians (p ≤0.05).

Results

Thirty-seven clinicians participated, with an overall mean torque value of 34.30 N cm. The mean torque value of the achieved torque (34.30 ± 4.13 N cm) was statistically significantly less than the intended torque (p = 0.041). The male clinicians produced more statistically significantly accurate torque value (34.54 ± 3.78 N cm) than the female clinicians (p = 0.034), and the experienced clinicians produced more accurate torque values (34.9 ± 5.13 N cm) than the inexperienced clinicians (p = 0.048).

Conclusion

Within the limitation of this study, the use of MTLDs did not always produce consistent torque values and the technique by which the operators use the MTLD might affect the torque value.

How to cite this article

Al-Otaibi HN. Intended and Achieved Torque of Implant Abutment's Screw using Manual Wrenches in Simulated Clinical Setting. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):897-901.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Mateus R Tonetto, EM Maia Filho, RM dos Reis Santos, Darlon M Lima, SM da Silva Pereira, Janir A Soares, RR de Jesus Tavarez, Meire C Ferreira, Ceci N Carvalho, C de Castro Rizzi

Shaping Ability of ProTaper Next, WaveOne, and Reciproc in Simulated Root Canals

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:5] [Pages No:902 - 906]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1951  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

The study aimed to compare the shaping and preservation of the original curvature of simulated curved root canals using the following instruments: Reciproc (Rcp), WaveOne (Wo), and the ProTaper Next system (Ptn).

Materials and methods

A total of 45 resin blocks with simulated curved root canals were divided into three groups (n = 15), prepared using the Rcp (R25), Wo (25/0.8), and Ptn (X2) instruments. Standardized photographs were taken before and after canal instrumentation. After the superimposition of the images, the amount of resin removed from the curvature's inner and outer walls was measured at six apical levels, at intervals of 1 mm. The canals’ angles of curvature before and after instrumentation were subtracted.

Results

There were no significant differences between the instruments in terms of the total amount of resin removed of the inner or outer walls of the apical curvature (p > 0.05). The Rcp instruments provided the best resin removed ratios between the walls. The means of the change in angle were as follows: Wo = 2.15°, Ptn = 0.92°, and Rcp = 0.21°. WaveOne caused significantly higher deviations than Rcp.

Conclusion

All of the instruments demonstrated a tendency to straighten the simulated root canal. Instruments that use rotary movement achieved an effect similar to that of the reciprocating instruments in relation to change in angle.

Clinical significance

Deviations from the original shape of the root canal could have a negative impact on the quality of a filling and consequently on the success of the endodontic treatment.

How to cite this article

Maia Filho EM, dos Reis Santos RM, Lima DM, da Silva Pereira SM, Soares JA, de Jesus Tavarez RR, Ferreira MC, Carvalho CN, Bandeca MC, Tonetto MR, Borges AH, de Castro Rizzi C. Shaping Ability of ProTaper Next, WaveOne, and Reciproc in Simulated Root Canals. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):902-906.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Antoine Berberi, Dagher Maroun, Wasfi Kanj, El Zoughbi Amine, Aramouni Philippe

Micromovement Evaluation of Original and Compatible Abutments at the Implant–abutment Interface

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:7] [Pages No:907 - 913]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1952  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Use of compatible abutments may increase micromovements between the abutments, and the inner part of the implant may increase the stress on marginal bone level. Also micromovement will change the volume of the inner space of the implant–abutment complex. The resulting pumping effect can transport even initially immobile microorganisms from the exterior to the interior and vice versa.

Objectives

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the mechanical comportment of OsseoSpeed™ Tx implants connected with original and compatible abutments in vitro under simulated clinical loading conditions.

Materials and methods

A total of 15 OsseoSpeed™ TX implants (4×11 mm) were used and divided into three groups (n = 5). Three types of abutments were used in the study; group I: Five original Ti Design™ abutments, group II: Five Natea™ abutments, and group III: Implanet™ abutments. Abutments used in groups II and III were all compatible with Astra Tech Implant System™. Implants were embedded into resin. Simulating the human masticatory cycle, the axial force vector was increased up to a defined maximum (25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, and 200 N) and inclined 30° to the implant axis. A radiograph amplifier was used to convert the X-ray projection into a picture. The visual evaluation of the frames and the provided X-ray videos were evaluated for an existing microgap in width and length between the implant and the abutment.

Results

An initial width gap was observed in groups II and III in four of the five samples with an average of 6.5 and 5 μm respectively. When the axial forces reach 75 N, only groups II and III demonstrated a gap width of 5.2 ± 3.63 and 4.8 ± 3.03 μm, and a gap length of 5.2 ± 3.63 and 94 ± 125.3 μm respectively. At 200 N, group I showed a gap width of 8.4 ± 1.67 μm and a gap length of 187.6 ± 43.6 μm, while groups II and III showed a gap width of 12.4 ± 3.29 and 22.8 ± 5.76 μm, and a gap length of 387.2 ± 84.36 and 641.2 ± 122.6 μm respectively.

Conclusion

Within the limitations of this study and under the parameters used and from the resulting data collected, we can presume that the use of compatible components leads to significant micromovement when compared with the use of original ones.

Clinical significance

The use of compatible prosthetic components with original implants showed significant micromovements when compared with the use of abutment and implant from the same manufacturer. Clinically, the micromovements when associated with leakage leads to bone loss around the neck of the implant and later to peri-implantitis.

How to cite this article

Berberi A, Maroun D, Kanj W, Amine EZ, Philippe A. Micromovement Evaluation of Original and Compatible Abutments at the Implant–abutment Interface. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):907-913.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Edmond Chaptini, Elie Khoury, Vittorio Cacciafesta, Nada Naaman

Effect of Intraoral Aging on Debris Accumulation and Friction of First Molar Tubes

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:6] [Pages No:914 - 919]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1953  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

The aim of this article was to evaluate the impact of intraoral aging and site specificity on debris accumulation and friction in molar tubes after intraoral use.

Materials and methods

A total of 80 intraorally used first molar convertible tubes were provided by 20 orthodontic adolescent patients after 6 months of treatment. The specimens were divided into eight groups (n = 10) according to the mouth quadrant and the type of examination [four groups of ten tubes for scanning electron microscope (SEM) and four groups of ten tubes for friction test]. Scanning electron microscope examination was performed after opening the convertible caps and friction test was executed using a 0.019” × 0.025” stainless steel wire, which was inserted in the tubes belonging to each group. The Mann. Whitney test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Bonferroni tests were performed for statistical analysis at 0.01 level of significance.

Results

There was a significant increase in the amount of debris and frictional force after 6 months of intraoral exposure (p < 0.0001). Debris scores were higher (10% increase) on the upper tubes when compared with the lower ones, with no statistical difference. Mean frictional force ranged from 0.22 to 0.26 N according to the mouth quadrant, but the difference between groups was also not significant.

Conclusion

After 6 months of intraoral exposure, there was a significant increase in the amount of debris in the first molar tube slots, leading to significantly higher frictional forces during sliding mechanics. The influence of site specificity on the amount of debris and on frictional forces of the first molar tubes could not be demonstrated.

Clinical significance

Molar tubes should be cleaned, before and during sliding mechanics, in order to minimize friction.

How to cite this article

Chaptini E, Khoury E, Cacciafesta V, Naaman N. Effect of Intraoral Aging on Debris Accumulation and Friction of First Molar Tubes. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):914-919.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Bandar MA Al-Makramani, Fuad A Al-Sanabani, Abdul AA Razak, Mohamed I Abu-Hassan, Ibrahim Z AL-Shami, Hosain M Almansour

Effect of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-ceramic Material

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:6] [Pages No:920 - 925]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1954  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) of Turkom-Cera (Turkom-Ceramic (M) Sdn. Bhd., Puchong, Malaysia) all-ceramic material cemented with resin cement Panavia-F (Kuraray Medical Inc., Okayama, Japan).

Materials and methods

Forty Turkom-Cera ceramic disks (10 mm × 3 mm) were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. The disks were wet ground to 1000-grit and subjected to four surface treatments: (1) No treatment (Control), (2) sandblasting, (3) silane application, and (4) sandblasting + silane. The four groups of 10 specimens each were bonded with Panavia-F resin cement according to manufacturer's recommendations. The SBS was determined using the universal testing machine (Instron) at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. Failure modes were recorded and a qualitative micromorphologic examination of different surface treatments was performed. The data were analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests.

Results

The SBS of the control, sandblasting, silane, and sandblasting + silane groups were: 10.8 ± 1.5, 16.4 ± 3.4, 16.2 ± 2.5, and 19.1 ± 2.4 MPa respectively. According to the Tukey HSD test, only the mean SBS of the control group was significantly different from the other three groups. There was no significant difference between sandblasting, silane, and sandblasting + silane groups.

Conclusion

In this study, the three surface treatments used improved the bond strength of resin cement to Turkom-Cera disks.

Clinical significance

The surface treatments used in this study appeared to be suitable methods for the cementation of glass infiltrated all-ceramic restorations.

How to cite this article

Razak AAA, Abu-Hassan MI, AL-Makramani BMA, AL-Sanabani FA, AL-Shami IZ, Almansour HM. Effect of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-Ceramic Material. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):920-925.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Mohammed Mustafa, Zaid AlJeaidi, Wafa Hassan AlAajam, Kawthar Ahmed Dafaalla Mohammed

Study of Caries Prevalence among Miswak and Non-Miswak Users: A Prospective Study

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:4] [Pages No:926 - 929]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1955  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Various types of oral hygiene measures have been practiced by different populations around the world, as there is difference in the oral hygiene products including toothpicks and toothpowders. Miswak or tooth cleaning stick, for mechanical tooth cleaning, can be traced back at least to pre-Islamic times. Currently, many of the world populations still use chewing sticks as the single method for tooth brushing. The present study was done to study the incidence and prevalence of caries among Miswak and non-Miswak users.

Materials and methods

The study was done consisting of 120 cases and 120 control group (60 boys and 60 girls in each group) from the secondary school. The materials used were light, explorer, mirror, gloves, upper and lower teeth models, Miswak, and common toothbrush.

After the recording of the primary data, Miswak was given to case group and the students were trained to use it on the teeth models.

After 2 years, the examination of the teeth was done using the same method as before start of the study and by the same investigators. All the data were recorded, tabulated, and analyzed with the help of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) statistics version 17 using Student's t-test.

Results

From the 240 participants, only 211 had continued the study for the total period of time. Out of these, 111 were from the study group and 100 from the control group. On comparison of the decayed-missing-filled (DMF) index scores of the study and control groups, before and after completion of the study, had also shown that the caries index was increased and the difference was found to be statistically significant.

Conclusion

From the study, it can be concluded that the study group using Miswak had less number of caries incidence than the control group of non-Miswak.

Clinical significance

Miswak can be used as teeth cleaning aid in day-to-day life as it can reduce the caries incidence.

How to cite this article

Mustafa M, AlJeaidi Z, AlAajam WH, Dafaalla Mohammed KA. Study of Caries Prevalence among Miswak and Non-Miswak Users: A Prospective Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):926-929.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Javed Khan, B Vikas Prasad, Gauri S Kakatkar, Meetu Jain, Maulik Patel, Preet Jain

A Case–control Study for the Assessment of Correlation of Denture-related Sores and Oral Cancer Risk

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:4] [Pages No:930 - 933]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1956  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Although multifactorial, the exact pathogenesis of oral cancer is still unclear. Apart from tobacco chewing and smoking, chronic long-term irritation by ill-fitting denture is also said to be an important risk factor for the development of oral cancer. Literature quotes some amount of evidence that correlates long-term denture irritation as a risk factor for the development of oral cancer. Hence, we analyzed the correlation of denturerelated sores as a risk factor for the development of oral cancer.

Materials and methods

The present case–control study included 140 newly diagnosed oral cancer cases and 140 patients as the control healthy group. One-hour questionnaire was framed and was conducted to the control group and the study group by 10 experienced interviewers who were trained for such type of analysis. Assessment of the patients’ socioeconomic status, cigarette smoking habit, alcohol drinking habit, and oral health status was done and compared on the two study groups. Logistic regression models along with multivariate models were used for the assessment of the results.

Results

In the control group and the cancer patient group, total of 140 new cancer cases and 140 subjects were included. Out of 140 patients in the cancer group, 16 were nonsmokers, while 110 smoked cigarette in the cancer patient group. As far as alcohol consumption is concerned, 42 patients in the control group and 102 patients in the oral cancer group were chronic heavy drinkers. Fried food intake was high in both the groups. Significant correlation was obtained while comparing the heavy smokers, heavy alcohol consumers, and oral health status in both the study groups.

Conclusion

Our results favor the hypothesis that positive correlation exists between oral cancer risk and recurrent denture sores.

Clinical significance

People wearing denture prosthesis should be periodically visualized for identification of any mucosal alteration or changes at the earliest.

How to cite this article

Jain P, Jain M, Prasad BV, Kakatkar GS, Patel M, Khan J. A Case–control Study for the Assessment of Correlation of Denture-related Sores and Oral Cancer Risk. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):930-933.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Manish Kumar, Gayithri H Kulkarni, Prashant Jadhav, Kiran Kulkarni, Sachin V Shinde, Yojana B Patil

Assessment of Myeloperoxidase and Nitric Levels around Dental Implants and Natural Teeth as a Marker of Inflammation: A Comparative Study

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:5] [Pages No:934 - 938]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1957  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Dental implants form the mainstay of dental treatment involving rehabilitation of missing teeth. One of the major concerns for the clinicians doing dental implants is the postsurgical failure of dental implants. Success of dental implants is dependent upon the skills of the surgeon and the amount and quality of the bone remaining at the edentulous area where dental implant has to be placed. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and nitrites are few of the enzymes and molecules which are said to be altered in inflammation. However, their exact role in the inflammatory processes around natural tooth and dental implant is still unclear. Hence we comparatively evaluated the levels of MPO and nitrites in the areas around the dental implants and natural teeth.

Materials and methods

The present study comprises 42 patients who underwent prosthetic rehabilitation by dental implants from 2011 to 2014. Depth of probing value (DP), score of plaque index (SPI), gingival index (GI), and index of gingival bleeding time (GBT) were evaluated for the assessment of the periimplant soft tissue changes. Assessment of inflammation around the dental implant surface and around natural tooth was done based on the readings of these parameters. For the measurement of the MPO levels, spectrophotometric MPO assay was used. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software.

Results

The mean plaque index values were 1.56 and 0.97 in periodontitis cases of natural teeth and inflamed cases of dental implants respectively. While comparing mean plaque index, mean probing depth, and mean gingival bleeding index in between the two groups, significant difference was obtained. Mean MPO concentration in periodontitis and gingivitis cases in natural teeth were 0.683 and 0.875 U/μL, while in inflamed dental implant cases, the mean value was 0.622 U/μL. While comparing the total MPO levels, total nitrite levels, and total nitrite concentration in between two study groups, significant difference was obtained. On comparing the healthy and periodontitis cases in natural teeth, significant difference was obtained.

Conclusion

In the inflammatory processes occurring around dental implant and natural teeth, MPO and NO make some amount of significant contribution.

Clinical significance

The present study enforces on the role of MPO and nitrite as diagnostic and prognostic marker.

How to cite this article

Kulkarni GH, Jadhav P, Kulkarni K, Shinde SV, Patil YB, Kumar M. Assessment of Myeloperoxidase and Nitric Levels around Dental Implants and Natural Teeth as a Marker of Inflammation: A Comparative Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):934-938.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Niyaz Mohammed, MC Noushad, Biji Balan, N Dhanesh, Nishi Jayasheelan, Vanita D Revankar

Apical Extrusion of Intracanal Bacteria following use of Two Engine-driven Instrumentation Techniques: An in vitro Study

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:4] [Pages No:939 - 942]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1958  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

The aim of the present study was to compare in vitro the amount of debris extruded apically from extracted teeth, using Twisted files and ProTaper rotary during two different instrumentation systems.

Materials and methods

Forty-five human single-rooted mandibular premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups and contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. The teeth in experimental groups were instrumented until reaching the working length with ProTaper rotary instruments and Twisted files with XSmart and XSmart Dual groups. Debris extruded from the apical foramen was collected into glass vials and the amount of bacteria was calculated. The data obtained were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Mann–Whitney U tests, with p = 0.05 as the level for statistical significance.

Results

The XSmart Dual group extruded comparatively lesser bacteria compared to the XSmart group. Lesser amount of bacterial extrusion was seen when Twisted files were used compared to the ProTaper files (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

Under the circumstances of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that all instrumentation techniques produced measurable apical extrusion of debris. So, it is upon the practitioner to decide which system best fits their individual needs and their level of skill and experience that will provide the best possible endodontic care for our patients.

Clinical significance

The newer instrument designs, including noncutting tips, different cross sections, radial lands, and variable tapers, are better for the clinicians to improve working safety, to reduce the working time, and to create a greater flare within the preparations.

How to cite this article

Mohammed N, Noushad MC, Balan B, Dhanesh N, Jayasheelan N, Revankar VD. Apical Extrusion of Intracanal Bacteria following use of Two Engine-driven Instrumentation Techniques: An in vitro Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):939-942.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

KMK Masthan, E Vinesh, M Sathish Kumar, S Marytresa Jeyapriya, Aravindha Babu, Meera Thinakaran

A Clinicopathologic Study of Oral Changes in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Gastritis, and Ulcerative Colitis

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:5] [Pages No:943 - 947]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1959  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Objectives

The aim and objectives of this study are to identify oral changes in certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, namely gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcerative colitis, gastritis, and to evaluate these oral symptoms as indicators for assessing GI disorders.

Materials and methods

In this study, the oral manifestations of various GI disorders were assessed in a varying age group of 250 patients in Government Stanley Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. Out of 250 patients, 142 were affected by GERD, 99 were affected by gastritis, and 9 patients were affected by ulcerative colitis. Of these patients, 177 were males and 73 were females.

Results

Evaluation of patients with gastritis revealed that 66.7% affected with gingivitis, 19.2% with dental erosion on the palatal and lingual aspects of maxillary and mandibular teeth predominantly in the anterior region, 10.1% with periodontitis, 2% with gingival erythema. Among the patients with GERD, 44% of the cases showed dental erosion, 25.5% periodontitis, 9.9% gingivitis, 5.7% gingival erythema, 2.8% palatal erythema, 2.1% gingival ulcers, glossitis 2%, 1.4% floor of the mouth erythema, and 0.7% erythema of the tongue. Patients with ulcerative colitis showed 44.4% of gingival erythema, 33.3% of dental erosions, and 22.2% of gingival ulcers and periodontitis.

Conclusion

In our study of 250 patients, oral manifestations were observed in 88% of the patients. Both soft tissue and hard tissue changes were evident. There was a high correlation between various GI disease and dental erosion, erythema at various sites of the oral cavity, oral ulcers, gingivitis, periodontitis, and glossitis. Careful evaluation of oral cavity may unveil many GI disorders and help the patient by providing early diagnosis, which further facilitates the prognosis.

How to cite this article

Vinesh E, Masthan KMK, Kumar MS, Jeyapriya SM, Babu A, Thinakaran M. A Clinicopathologic Study of Oral Changes in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Gastritis, and Ulcerative Colitis. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):943-947.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Gautam VS Kumar, Anupama Nigam, Ahmad Naeem, Abhishek Gaur, Kaushik Kumar Pandey, Abhimanyu Deora

Reinforcing Heat-cured Poly-methyl-methacrylate Resins using Fibers of Glass, Polyaramid, and Nylon: An in vitro Study

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:5] [Pages No:948 - 952]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1960  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

As civilization has progressed, there has been continued refinement of materials available for dental practice. The applications of resins have been extended to increased practical uses in numerous areas of prosthetic and restorative dentistry. Certain significant alterations in the technique of manipulation and nature of the dental product have influenced the range of application in dentistry. The present study was done to measure and compare the fracture strength of heat polymerized poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) resin reinforced with fibers of glass, polyaramid, and nylon.

Materials and methods

The present study was conducted in vitro on 40 PMMA denture base resin specimens. Specimens were divided into four subgroups with ten specimens each and tested for transverse strength using universal testing machine.

Results

In group I, the transverse strength mean value was 67.82 MPa. In group II, the transverse strength mean value was 59.47 MPa. In group III, the transverse strength mean value was 66.87 MPa, while in group IV, the transverse strength mean value was 66.47 MPa.

Conclusion

Incorporation of 4% weight glass fibers in loose form significantly increased the transverse strength of denture base PMMA, while 4% of polyaramid fiber in random distribution significantly increased the transverse strength of denture base PMMA.

How to cite this article

Kumar VSG, Nigam A, Naeem A, Gaur A, Pandey KK, Deora A. Reinforcing Heat-cured Polymethyl- methacrylate Resins using Fibers of Glass, Polyaramid, and Nylon: An in vitro Study. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016; 17(11):948-952.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Shameeka Thopte, Aastha Chopra, Amit A Mhapuskar, Swati Marathe, Shams U Nisa, Rashmi Saddiwal

Evaluation of Osseointegration in Implants using Digital Orthopantomogram and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:5] [Pages No:953 - 957]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1961  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Accurate assessment of osseointegration in dental implants requires precise radiographic visualization of pathologic conditions as well as anatomical structures. The present study aimed to evaluate the formation of bony tissue (osseointegration) using digital orthopantomogram (OPG) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) immediately after implant insertion (within 7 days) and 3 months postinsertion.

Materials and methods

Twenty single-implant sites on mandibular posterior regions were selected on patients irrespective of their gender. Both digital OPG and CBCT were done within a week and again after 3 months of implant insertion surgery, using the same exposure parameters.

Results

Three of the 20 implants were submerged and were excluded as the crestal bone height could not be measured. The participants were recalled for radiographic measurements after 3 months of implant placement. On an average, there was 0.03 mm of osseointegration at the apical portion after 3 months of implant insertion on digital OPG; 0.04 mm of osseointegration at the crestal bone height after 3 months on digital OPG; and 0.01 mm of osseointegration at the apical portion after 3 months on CBCT. No change or ≤0.02 mm of osseointegration at crestal bone height after 3 months on CBCT.

Conclusion

Both digital OPG and CBCT are significant for the assessment of osseointegration in implants, and hence, endow definite benefit for accurate assessment in terms of the success of the implant placement.

Clinical significance

However, CBCT is a better mode of evaluating dental implants but one should keep in mind that radiographic examination must be conducted to the benefit of the patient by application of the lowest achievable dose.

How to cite this article

Chopra A, Mhapuskar AA, Marathe S, Nisa SU, Thopte S, Saddiwal R. Evaluation of Osseointegration in Implants using Digital Orthopantomogram and Cone Beam Computed Tomography. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):953-957.

CASE REPORT

Maria I Meurer, Liliane J Grando, Elena RC Rivero, Carlos ECP Souza, Carlos B Marcondes

A Rare Case of Labial Myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis

[Year:2016] [Month:November] [Volume:17] [Number:11] [Pages:4] [Pages No:958 - 961]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1962  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

The aim of this article is to present a rare case of myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis. Myiasis is a disease caused by invasion of tissues of animals and humans by larval stages of dipterous (2-winged) flies. There are few reports of oral myiasis in the literature, mostly related to Cochliomyia hominivorax larvae. We present a case of a 53-year-old man with painful swelling of the left lower lip that was confirmed to be myiasis caused by D. hominis. Though more common in tropical and subtropical regions of North and South America, myiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous masses among residents or travelers in endemic areas.

How to cite this article

Meurer MI, Grando LJ, Rivero ERC, Souza CECP, Marcondes CB. A Rare Case of Labial Myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(11):958-961.

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.